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June 2008: What Are They Saying About Woopra?

Woopra News - July 3rd, 2008 by .

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As was recently reported here on the Woopra blog, was a highlight of the LTPact 2008 Conference in Las Vegas with the co-founders of Woopra, Elie Khoury and Jad Younan, flying in from Lebanon for the event and to spent time in the United States visiting Woopra fans and customers. There are photographs of the event on Lorelle on WordPress.

News and favorable reviews about Woopra are everywhere as more than 20,000 beta testers have been approved, an amazing number. If you have reviewed Woopra lately, be sure and send us a trackback, use our Contact form, or email Lorelle at Woopra.com.

Technoboogie claims Woopra is “Opening a Can of Woopass on Google Analytics?” in their review:

Google analytics step over. Okay, so maybe that’s an overstatement, but Woopra is offering a web analytics and statistics service that could soon be force to reckon with.

What’s so cool about Woopra? Well essentially it offers a lot of the features that Google Analytics does but it also offers a lot of stuff that GA doesn’t. Take near real time updates, over 40 stat feeds are constantly being updated, which gives you a real indication of who’s coming to your site, where they’re coming from and where they’re going to. And all of that live.

Then there’s the graphical interface. Does it matter that it looks better than Google Analytics? Yes. The use of colours takes powerful statistical analysis to the next level, without sacrificing functionality. It looks hot, and it manages to do so without getting naff and sacrificing number crunching power. It is powerful and it is beautiful. And that’s a big move forward.


Rebecca Leaman (guest blogging on Ben Barden’s blog) made an interesting connection between Woopra and Hemingway and “web content that travels” by exploring the visitor tagging feature:

Woopra is a real-time site stats program with what I’d consider a needlessly complex interface for most bloggers’ purposes; and it’s dangerously addictive, so I probably won’t continue to use it for long. But there is a very cool feature: “tagged visitors.” After someone comments on your blog, his subsequent visits are tagged with his name, rather than Visitor #1897 or such.

It feels a bit voyeuristic, to identify individual visitors without so much as a Whois lookup. But it also makes it easy to distinguish between the actions of two very different types of visitors.

On the one blog I’ve got Woopra-enabled, visitors who found it through a search engine results page (SERP) showed a 94% bounce rate, <1% rate of return visits, and an average page view of 1.2 with less than 20 seconds on site. Granted, a one-week trial is hardly scientific — but it was the comparison with tagged visitors that really made a light bulb come on for me: Tagged visitors to the blog, on average, checked in 3 times during the week, and averaged 3.2 minutes and 6.7 page views each time.

Those numbers aren’t a great surprise — after all, SERPs traffic tends to be people on a mission to solve a specific problem; maybe they find their answer on your blog, or they don’t, but either way they usually click on through. And that’s dandy, if your blogging goal is to get a high volume of traffic onto your site and off again by way of a high-CTR advertisement.

But what if you’re trying to build a community of loyal readers, to establish yourself and your site as a go-to expert resource on your niche topic, or to promote your own products, skills and professional services with your blog?

Website Magazine was impressed with the real time aspect of Woopra:

I came across Woopra today via Manoj Jasra’s Web Analytics World weblog. The beta tracking tool has all the standard metrics that Google Analytics offers, plus two very interesting features that Google Analytics doesn’t – yet. The first is real time visitor analysis – showing users what source visitors comes from, the page they are on, and their path around the site. Another interesting feature is a built-in chat tool, which allows users to initiate popup messages to website visitors and actually talk to them – a terrific way to keep visitors moving along the sales funnel.

Web Analytics World compares Woopra casually against five other analytics tools, and like Website Magazine, noticed that Woopra has at least two features (with more coming) that Google Analytics doesn’t:

This is a great alternative to Google Analytics! Woopra is a very new tool, and is fresh out of the beta oven. This tracking tool is ideal for less trafficked websites, especially for blogs. It offers all the standard metrics that Google Analytics offers, plus two cool features that Google Analytics doesn’t offer. Firstly, it has real time visitor analysis (creepy but great – you can see exactly which source your visitor comes from, the page they are on, and their path around your site etc), and secondly, they offer a great built in chat tool, that allows you to popup messages to your website visitors and actually talk to them – this is great for generating real time feedback or to offer help. Might be worth checking out, especially for those of you looking to try something different than the leading free Google Analytics tool.

Past/Prologue reviewed Woopra in Dutch (English Translation) and said, “..it’s sometimes nice to look at this. But Woopra indicates there is a whole new dimension. Because Woopra gives you not only stats, it tells you even live stats…In short, Woopra is impressive, free slick (the app yet) and actually quite scary. Try it out. Try it out.”

Darren Herman described Woopra in “Where Analytics Are Heading: The Woopra Terminal” as:

Very simply: MyBlogLog meets Google Analytics and has a baby, and then morphs into a Bloomberg Terminal of the next century. Very, very interesting, at least to me it is…

What I like about Woopra is that it gives me information in near real-time and tells me where my audience is going and where they have been on my website. Generally, all of the data exists on server logs, but I like the advanced graphical representation of my data. In the screenshots above, you can see the ticker on the bottom of the page that scrolls with data from the server.

Allan Joseph of ajb{log}: Learn Something New Each Day says that Woopra is a breath of fresh air on the web analytics front:

We know that Google Analytics dominates the free web analytics space. I’d say Woopra can quickly become #2 with the added innovations to the app.

I’ve tried almost every single free web analytics app out there and Woopra is a breath of fresh air. I simply love it.

Tech Blog Philliphines calls Woopra “elegant” as a site tracking and monitoring program and admits that Woopra has so many great features, it’s hard to share them all, but he tried:

Site tracking and site analysis tool has never been technical and fun at the same time. Mostly technical, sometimes funny when things get scrambled down and messes with some parts of your brain’s mathematical cells. Well, I would like to introduce Woopra.

Woopra can be defined in the shortest possible elegant monitoring software in these words as world’s most comprehensive, information rich, easy to use, real-time Web tracking and analysis application.

….Bottomline, Woopra revolutionizes the way we see our incoming and outgoing site visitors, their country, flags, search query, site movements, IP address, browsers details and so much more presented in a more full featured, intuitive and interactive real-time desktop environment right from your finger tips.

While a fairly irreverent review, Head Rambles admits that Woopra is addictive:

I don’t normally get my jollies out of software.

Software is just something I install on my computer to cause it to crash.

But I installed a piece of software last week, and it actually got the pulse rate to increase [very slightly].

If you run a blog, then this software is a cracker.

DON’T INSTALL IT. If you do, you will regret it, because it is hypnotic. You’ll spend hours just watching it.

He goes on to describe tracking someone across his site and tagging them so he can watch them return, a Woopra feature many are loving as their numbers become behavior become people worth watching.

Trendhunter gave Woopra a positive review, admitting he added a second monitor to keep track of Woopra’s live statistics:

I found it so beneficial, I installed a second screen that constantly features Woopra. It is fascinating to see readers check my blog in real life.

You can see where they landed from, which search terms they used, on which item they land and which posts or pages or categories they read. It is almost too addictive and together with Twitter makes me forget Facebook entirely.

…You can tag your readers, so you can really start communicating with them if you wish via the chat box, Twitter or mail. If you blog with WordPress like I do, you can download a plugin that tags your subscribers so you can see your subscribers log in.

Johnux reviews Woopra and goes into detail on how to add Woopra to Joomla. The key is to add the Woopra javascript to a module like the header or footer that appears on every page of your blog or website for Woopra to track all the pages on your site. He even includes a video well worth watching on Woopra features.

The Last Podcast took a look at Woopra and also gives it a thumbs up against Google Analytics:

Woopra is a great stats program and rivals Google Analytics in its functionality. Analytics gives you an easier way of drilling down to some information and has a couple of more advanced functions (Adsense tracking etc.). For most people, these advanced functions are overkill. I basically like to see where people are coming from and how many of you there are.

Woopra has become a standard fixture on my desktop already.

The Last Podcast took a look at Woopra and also gives it a thumbs up against Google Analytics:

Woopra is a great stats program and rivals Google Analytics in its functionality. Analytics gives you an easier way of drilling down to some information and has a couple of more advanced functions (Adsense tracking etc.). For most people, these advanced functions are overkill. I basically like to see where people are coming from and how many of you there are.

Woopra has become a standard fixture on my desktop already.

More Woopra reviews and coverage includes:

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