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Overriding the Woopra Default Visitor Timeout Setting

Using Woopra - March 4th, 2010 by .

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A little known fact about Woopra is that there is a default visitor timeout setting which essentially shows the user as gone after several minutes of inactivity. This is something that was requested by a number of users in the early days who argued that they didn’t want to know about users who were just sitting idle because they weren’t really “live”.

So we implemented the timeout setting, which by default is 6 minutes. This means that if a user doesn’t do anything within 6 minutes Woopra makes them disappear until they do something else. When they reload another page, they are again counted, but it shows as if they are returning on another visit.

For those who wish to increase this default timeout because you have visitors who tend to spend much longer on a page, you can easily override the function. Here are two options:

  • For WordPress users there is an option within the WordPress plugin that you can use to manually set the timeout to a higher value. Simply enter the time you want in seconds:
  • For those who are inserting the Woopra javascript manually in the footer of your site, you can add one additional line to specify the timeout settings. The value in the entry must be numerical where 1,000 = 1 second. So for example, 60,000 = 1 minute; 600,000 = 10 minutes, and so forth:
    <!-- Woopra Code Start -->
    <script type="text/javascript" src="//static.woopra.com/js/woopra.v2.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    <font style="color:red">woopraTracker.setIdleTimeout(100000);</font>
    woopraTracker.track();
    </script>
    <!-- Woopra Code End -->

Feel free to give this a try. You may notice that you have a few more visitors listed as “live” on your site, but remember that there is some debate as to what “live” actually means if they are just sitting on a page not actually doing anything.

We don’t recommend that you set the timeout too high or you will have “stuck” visitors on the site such as people who left the site open in a tab overnight. It makes much more sense to allow them to be reflected as returning for a second visit when they become active.

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